Smehkaleen

...And Other Ramblings

  • 20th August
    2014
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Messrs. Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot, and Prongs
Purveyors of Aids to Magical Mischief-Makers
are proud to present
The Marauder's Map

I’m pretty sure this was the best thing JKR ever wrote.

(Source: btgrl, via jamespottersexhair)

  • 20th August
    2014
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If you don't have many followers- how do you get reads on your fanfic?

Asked by: Anonymous

thejilyship:

This is something that I’m sure a lot of people struggle with, sometimes producing a quality story isn’t enough to draw in readers. Here are a couple of tips/tricks that I’ve picked up over the last few years:

  • Read and review other people’s stories. I almost always check out the profiles and stories of people who take the time to review my work on ff.net.
  • Updating regularly helps too. People like to have what they want now, and so if you give it to them quickly, they will like you that much more. Be careful not to substitute quantity for quality though.
  • On tumblr, tag things appropriately. Nothing annoys me more than having someone put something in a tag when it really has no business being there. I know it seems like the more tags you put on something, the more people will see it, but if you don’t tag it appropriately, people will skip over it in annoyance.
  • For some reason, I’ve found that if you put a picture along with something advertising your story, more people will look at it. So, there’s that I suppose. Just make sure not to use other people’s edits or anything without explicitly stating that the work is not yours. I’ve been seeing people do that more often than usual. Stop it.

That’s all I can think of right now.

Feel free to add things to the list if you have any other tips/tricks.

I also find that if you update regularly and set up a schedule so that way your readership knows what day you update, it helps draw people in.  It gives everyone something to look forward to.

Also, I think author’s notes tend to influence whether or not someone reviews.  I think putting them at the end of the chapter (unless pertinent to the beginning) helps to encourage people to review.  I often skip lengthy notes if I’m not familiar with the author.  Keep it short and sweet until you know people are reading them.  Also, humor never hurts.  One tactic you might try is asking your readers a question.  Even if it doesn’t apply to the chapter, you might inspire more feedback.

My last bit of advice is tough to follow: don’t get too concerned with the amount of reviews.  Not everyone on the internet leaves feedback.  That doesn’t mean that they don’t enjoy the fic or that they haven’t been moved by it.  Also, I find that some stories that do have tons of reviews are actually kinda mediocre (but have accumulated so many due to sheer length and amount of chapters) or just have smut.  There are fantastic fics with low review counts.  The important thing as a writer is just to keep telling the story in the best way you can.  And that’s really all that matters.

  • 20th August
    2014
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    2014
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  • 19th August
    2014
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  • 19th August
    2014
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  • 19th August
    2014
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apiratecalledav:

I like to think that when Snape got to Wizard Heaven, James shook Snape’s hand and was all, “You saved my son’s life. I’ll never be able to thank you.”  And Lily was all, “BUT YOU TREATED HIM LIKE SHIT!” and whacked him upside the head.

  • 19th August
    2014
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  • 19th August
    2014
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